Gavin Scott | The Punch of 1946
1257
single,single-post,postid-1257,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,vertical_menu_enabled,qode-title-hidden,side_area_uncovered_from_content,qode-theme-ver-8.0,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.9.2,vc_responsive
IMG_8012

01 Mar The Punch of 1946

The venerable British humorous magazine Punch, which began life in 1841, was still going strong in 1946, the year my novel The Age of Treachery takes place.

I’ve been able to get hold of one of the bound editions of the magazine from that year, and from time to time I’ll post things you might find interesting.

Nothing, I think, gives a better feel of a period than the things people might have been reading in trains, planes or in taxis, on their way to meet friends and enemies, chuckling gently at the gentle jokes, or nodding wisely at the rather beautifully drawn political cartoons.

This is the cover image for the bound volumes in the first  half of the year, drawn by E.H.Shepard, who was already famous for creating the wonderful illustrations for Winnie the Pooh.

I suspect, from this, that he was rather glad peace had returned. And with it – not just summer but a little of the ancient mythology (including the Great God Pan, here seen peeling potatoes) that had been set aside during six years of desperate warfare.

Whimsical England was back …

IF YOU ENJOYED THIS, PLEASE SHARE IT! THERE’S A BUTTON AT THE TOP OF THE POST!

 

 

No Comments

Post A Comment